The see-sawing of the Trayvon Martin case continues

Yesterday, it was pushback from George Zimmerman’s camp and his supporters. Now, new reports are surfacing that there was a push from within the Sanford, Florida Police Department to get homicide or manslaughter warrants for neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman very soon after the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. According to this article in the Huffington Post, there were delays in the state’s attorney’s office, and then the governor stepped in. It’s getting twisted and contradictory, but at least there’s some sign that someone looking at the case early had doubts about Zimmerman’s account–which, even when taken at face value, doesn’t add up.  

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Pimping my tweet for “That’s Just Peachy”

When I checked my website’s traffic this morning, I saw that a large amount was coming from That’s Just Peachy, a Georgia news website.  When I checked the site, I was happy to see the Brambleman cover art on the front page. The website had posted my tweet: “The Forsyth County Novel has been published. Deliverance meets The Da Vinci Code, kills mockingbird.”  This linked to the “The Book” page on my Brambleman website. Which is great, of course. I had hoped that the news organizations I’d tweeted and e-mailed would contact me for more information (and several have), but I wasn’t expecting my tweet to be published. It’s a good reminder that anything I tweet can be used for or against me…

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Pushback in Trayvon Martin case

Two developments to report. George Zimmerman’s account of why he shot and killed Trayvon Martin has surfaced, and Sanford police have signaled their backing of his story. The most recent news reports don’t explain why Zimmerman ignored police warnings and pursued Martin. Also, Zimmerman claims that he was screaming for help. Screams can be heard during a 911 call, but it has not been determined forensically who was crying out for help. One of many things the local police didn’t do. Also, news about Trayvon Martin’s drug-related suspension from high school. (There are also reports of graffiti and suspected burglary.) This doesn’t really have anything to do with the shooting, but it will be useful information for those people among us who…

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New book explores Forsyth County’s bloody history

News from Thornbriar Press For release upon receipt Download pdf version: Press Release 1 Brambleman Examines Forsyth County’s Racist Past A new novel by an award-winning writer and editor focuses attention on one of the most horrific acts of racism in U.S. history and its repercussions “unto the third and fourth generation.” Brambleman tells the story of down-and-out Atlanta writer Charlie Sherman, who is convinced by a mysterious stranger to finish a dead professor’s book about a crime that’s gone unpunished for decades. What Charlie works on is an unwieldy manuscript about the mob-driven expulsion of more than 1,000 blacks from Forsyth County, Georgia in 1912. However, Charlie also uncovers a terrible secret involving a Forsyth County land grab. Due to its…

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Trayvon Martin’s killer kicked out of college

They don’t know where George Zimmerman is, but they know where he’s not. The reason for his withdrawal from Seminole State College, where he was pursuing an Associate’s Degree in general studies: safety–his and everyone else’s. Orlando’s Channel Six has the report.  

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“I was nine years old when they ran us out”

Jacket copy “I was nine years old when they ran us out of Forsyth County in 1912. My father let me take one thing, a baseball he’d bought for me in the spring. I gripped it tight as we pulled away from our house. My mother was expecting my sister then, so she laid down in the back of the wagon. White men on horseback watched us with their rifles pointed in the air. Pop stared forward with the reins in his hands. ‘This is what they do, son,’ he told me. I heard glass break and turned to see a torch fly in our front window. Pop grabbed my head and twisted it so hard my neck hurt. ‘Boy, don’t look…

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