Environmentalist candidate John Noel says “Bye Bye” with fundraiser as PSC Chair Stan Wise rides off into the Swamp

Over his 23 years in office, Public Service Commission Chairman Stan “Swamp Thing” Wise taught Georgians the Cobb County way by shoving Georgia Power’s Plant Vogtle Units 3 and 4 down the state’s throat. If you’ve been a Cobb EMC customer or noticed how the Braves stadium deal came to pass, you know what I’m talking about: A good old boy network colludes with corporate interests to screw the public. And while Cobb EMC’s former manager faces dozens of racketeering charges, consumers will never get their money back. And the same goes for Vogtle, which may or may not be completed. Today was Wise’s last day on the job.  During Wise’s final meeting today, a colleague read from a Senate Resolution honoring…

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Huey Long: America’s most famous Public Service Commissioner

Huey Long, the “Kingfish” of Louisiana in the 1920s and 1930s was a skilled and shameless politician who had a plan to win the presidency of the United States, if he hadn’t been gunned down by an assassin in 1936 (or his own bodyguards, depending on who’s telling the story). He’s a fascinating character. The definitive biography of Huey Long was written by T. Harry Williams. An excellent read, but no longer in print, but if you’re a student of Southern history and ever see a copy, snatch it up. I won’t try to tell his story here, but let’s just say he was equal parts corrupt and brilliant, financing his campaigns through deductions from state employees’ paychecks. It’s said that he’d…

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Georgia Voter Guide is here

A lot of people put a lot of work into this, and I got to watch! Click to check it out! The 2018 Midterm Project: Voter Guide Georgia Trending Purple    

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Solar-powered Georgia PSC candidate John Noel builds momentum, takes lead in cash on hand

When looking at Georgia Public Service Commission races, it’s no surprise to see utility money flowing into GOP incumbents’ coffers. It’s the way they play the game. The shocker this year is that environmentalist John Noel—who is definitely not counting on utility support in his bid to unseat Chuck Eaton—has the most cash on hand of any candidate, Democrat or Republican. With only three months to go before the primary, this should be especially alarming to the competition. Not only that, but the news follows a whirlwind day in Athens for Noel that included a half-dozen media interviews and an enthusiastic response to his message: Ruth Pannill, president of Young Democrats of UGA, saw Noel speak at the Athens-Clarke County Democrats meeting…

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Finishing my father’s life’s work: It’s not just a job, it’s an indenture

Original Caption: Grant says his father’s book is inextricably linked to other facets of his life. He was scouring page proofs of The Way It Was in the South when his wife went into labor with their second child—son Nathan (shown above). This is the story behind a Georgia Book of the Year. Ah, yes, I remember it well. I was sitting in the delivery room marking up page proofs when Judy’s situation suddenly required my complete attention. I tell people that while Nathan may look young (he’s a college freshman now), he was born during World War I. Dad would like that. The Way It Was in the South: The Black Experience in Georgia was honored as an Editor’s Choice by American Heritage magazine and named…

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The classic book about Georgia’s black history

The Way It Was in the South: The Black Experience in Georgia by Donald L. Grant Edited with an Introduction by Jonathan Grant 624 pp., hardcover University of Georgia Press, 2001   Editors’ Choice — American Heritage Winner, Georgia “Author of the Year” Award Available wherever books are sold, or from the University of Georgia Press.  Read about the effort to complete my late father’s life’s work This readable, fast-paced account covers 450 years of Georgia’s African-American experience. Solidly researched and documented, The Way It Was in the South sets the record straight on the progress of blacks and the contributions they made to the state — and the solid wall of white resistance they encountered nearly every step of the way.…

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